Tag Archives: privacy

Oversharing in social media

6 Sep

A shaky line in the sand

I was thinking over the weekend about oversharing in social media.

I’ve always personally said I use Twitter primarily for sharing professional or interesting articles, blogs, pictures and events that I’ve found that might be relevant to other people interested in social media and the media industry. I try and connect with other people in my industry or in similar industries that have interests that match mine.

But my ‘purist’ view of how I use this medium was broken a few weeks ago, when I received a direct message from a person I had chated with a few times which ended with “How are your various health woes?” While the person had written that in honest concern (I think), I knew as soon as I saw it that I had started to become guilty of the affliction that seems to continuously overtake people who interact in social media. That of oversharing.

Throughout my university degree, the main social network was definitely Facebook. Almost all of my social group spent hours and hours every day interacting (and oversharing) on Facebook, posting status updates about exactly how we were feeling or what we were doing at that moment, a lot of the time with the underlying knowledge that that update might be seen by a certain somebody. Who can deny that they haven’t at some point updated their status with “… is feeling so sad right now” without the express intention of it being seen by that somebody you were feeling sad about. In part it relates back to the research that was presented at the last SMCSYD, which found that generation Y are extremely image conscious and consistently update to a set group of their social peers (using social media) in order to maintain that image. Some of the research can be found here, and Tiphereth’s presentation from the evening is up on her blog here.

Since university, I’ve dropped off the Facebook radar, and rarely update my status. In its place came Twitter, which ostentatiously I was using for ‘professional’ updates. And for over a year I was mainly using it for sharing professional/industry related links, with a few personal comments thrown in to convey (I hope) a little of my personality.

But as my workload has increased, due in part to changes at work and the additional (slightly crazy) decision to start MBA studies, I’ve found that the amount of time I’ve had to devote to the professional areas of the medium has dropped, and instead all my updates are personal. It does actually take free time to be on Twitter, to keep even slightly on top of the myriad of updates and links shared, and to interact with those shared links. And time is what I’m running short of.

Mostly this is a time management issue, and one that I’m sure I’ll get better with as I become more experienced. But it does bring up some interesting questions… if all I can realistically update Twitter with at the moment is personal updates on how stressed or sick I am, do I risk alienating my followers, of whom the majority I have to assume only follow me because they are interested in the links I share? I’m interested in how other people balance out this issue between personal/professional, as I haven’t seen it discussed anywhere else.

But the next question would be, does it matter? Through Twitter and social media I’ve met some lovely people, and also had some fantastic opportunities come my way – so considering that, Twitter also is a personal medium.

I’m not sure what I was trying to say with this blog post, other than that I’m finding it hard to not overshare and tip towards too much personal information at the moment (it has become my new Facebook), and I wonder what other people think about this or how they deal with it personally.

And on a completely personal note which no one needs to read:

As I’ve already missed one class after failing to leave on time from work on my first day ‘officially’ in my new role, I’m dropping of the radar for the next two weeks until after my mid-semester exams. If I have even a hope in hell of passing, I’m going to need to become a hermit for the next two weeks. My 2nd exam (Accounting) is on the 24th of September, which also happens to be my birthday, so I’ll be having a ‘welcome back social life’ and birthday celebration that night, and will be back on Twitter/blogs/online in general shortly after.

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The contentious issue of privacy in an age of sharing

1 Jul

I was thinking about privacy last night. Whatever form it takes, it always seems to polarize – from Facebook with their unclear privacy policy, to the protection of the names of children who are known to Community Services (bear with me, this isn’t a totally out of the blue topic).

My flatmate (who is a child protection case worker) was telling me last night how she’d love to write a blog or something similar about her experiences – but the legal issues associated with doing so make that impossible. We then got on to the the topic of how Community Services has a bad name in the media, because the only time they get mentioned is when a child dies. There is no focus on the thousands of children they have helped, or the often extremely hard conditions they work with. As my flatmate said, they need a reality show to follow them and show the public how hard the job actually is (and I don’t think anyone could deny that they’d find it facinating) – but because the children and parent’s names have to be protected this would be impossible. Just an interesting and different view on privacy.

Another thing that made me thing about privacy recently was Facebook. And no, I’m not talking about the confusing privacy settings – I’m talking about what people use it for. And who they want on there.

For me Facebook is a place for friends I’ve actually met, and that I want to keep in contact with or share things with. It’s not a place where I’ll network or add people who have similar interests to me. I have the tightest privacy settings that I can and I’m not even searchable. On the other hand I do have a unique name, so while my profile won’t come up you can get a lot of other information – but again, I keep a close eye on what that information is.

But now, the line is becoming slightly blurred. After months of encouragement, I’m finally managing Facebook pages for four different organisations – two through my work, and two as volunteer work for an Aboriginal rights not profit. Shameless plug for a good cause – the organisation is Australians for Native Title and Reconciliation (ANTaR) and their campaigns on Facebook are A Better Way and Respect. Probably the most well-known of their campaigns though is called Sea of Hands – but this was set up on Facebook before it had pages, so it is a group with almost 2,500 fans.

Last week I got a slew of friend requests from people I didn’t know. It confused me for a few days – I’ve tested with unfriending a friend and checked that I am totally unfindable on Facebook. Then I realised that the reason for the requests was because I’m starting to try and move those 2,500 fans over to a Facebook page – but when you post on a group, you post as yourself.

So now I’ve locked down even tighter. You can only add me as a friend if we have a friend in common. I’m also going to start creating levels of privacy for groups of friends – I don’t want the people I add through work to be able to see just how much fun I had at University.

I wonder if I’m unique in my approach to Facebook and how I use it. Or if I’m silly to even try and make Facebook my only private network. The whole push to Facebook pages is based around the idea that people want to be able to interact with brands and organisations online. Is my super tight privacy policy restricting this? Do other people in my industry have the same approach to their Facebook privacy?